Congratulations! You’ve submitted all of your college applications. You’ve spent countless hours studying for the SAT, researching colleges, maintaining your GPA, and writing your personal statement. The hard part is over. Now the waiting begins. 

There are a lot of important college admissions dates to keep track of, especially during the fall of your senior year, but when are regular decision notification dates? In this article, we will provide you with a comprehensive list of regular decision release dates. 

You may also want to review our article on when college acceptance letters are sent out and what to do while you wait

When does Regular Decision come out?

When will regular decisions be available? Regular decision notification dates occur several months after Early Action and Early Decision notification dates. This is because regular decision application deadlines occur several months later as well. That said, when exactly are regular decisions released? 

Regular decision dates vary. Typically, though, regular decision notification dates occur from Mid-March to Early April. It is also worth noting that Ivy League colleges coordinate their release dates each year. Although this day changes year to year, Ivy League colleges always send out their decisions in unison. 

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Regular Decision release dates 2023

Refer to the list of regular decision notification dates below. These dates will help you anticipate when you should hear back from colleges. Remember, colleges may postpone (or advance) their regular decision notification dates as spring approaches. 

Name of College

Notification Date

Agnes Scott College

April 15th

Allegheny College

March 15th

American University

Mid-March

Amherst College

Late March

Babson College

Mid-March

Barnard College

March 31st

Bates College

April 1st

Boston College

April 1st

Boston University

Late March

Bowdoin College

April 1st

Brandeis University

April 1st

Brown University

March 31st

Bryn Mawr College

Late March

Bucknell University

April 1st

California Institute of Technology

Mid-March

Carleton College

April 1st

Carnegie Mellon University

April 1st

Case Western University

March 19th

Claremont McKenna College

April 1st

Colby College

April 1st

Colgate University

Late March

College of William & Mary

April 1st

Colorado College

Mid-March

Columbia University

Late March

Cornell University

Late March

Dartmouth College

Late March

Davidson College

April 1st

Denison University

April 1st

Dickinson College

Late March

Duke University

Late March

Emory University

April 1st

Fordham University

April 1st

Franklin and Marshall College

April 1st

Georgia Tech

Early March

George Washington University

Late March

Georgetown University

April 1st

Grinnell College

Late March

Hamilton College

Mid-March

Hampton University

Rolling Admissions

Harvard University

Late March

Harvey Mudd College

Late March

Haverford College

Late March

Howard University

Early April

Johns Hopkins University

Late March

Kenyon College

Late March

Lafayette College

Late March

Lehigh University

Late March

Macalester College

Late March

Middlebury College

Late March

MIT

Mid-March

Morehouse College

Mid-March

New York University

Late March

North Carolina State

Late March

Northeastern University

April 1st

Northwestern University

Late March

Pomona College

April 1st

Princeton University

Late March

Reed College

April 1st

Rice University

April 1st

Sarah Lawrence College

Late March

Scripps College

April 1st

Southern Methodist University

Mid-March

Spelman College

April 1st

Stanford University

Early April

Swarthmore College

Late March

Syracuse University

Late March

Tufts University

April 1st

Tulane University

April 1st

Tuskegee University

Rolling Admissions

University of California-Berkeley

Late March

University of California-Los Angeles

April 1st

University of Chicago

Mid-March

University of Colorado at Boulder

April 1st

University of Delaware

Rolling Admissions

University of Kentucky

Mid-March

University of Maryland

April 1st

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Early March

University of Miami

April 1st

University of Michigan

Early April

University of Minnesota

Late March

University of North Carolina

Late March

University of Notre Dame

Late March

University of Pennsylvania

Late March

University of Richmond

April 1st

University of Rochester

Late March

University of San Diego

April 1st

University of San Francisco

Mid-March

University of Southern California

April 1st

University of Texas

March 1st

University of Vermont

Early March

University of Virginia

April 1st

University of Wisconsin

Late March

Vanderbilt University

April 1st

Vassar College

April 5th

Villanova University

April 1st

Virginia Tech

Early March

Wake Forest

April 1st

Washington and Lee University

April 1st

Washington University in St. Louis

April 1st

Wellesley College

Late March

Wesleyan University

Late March

Wheaton College

Late March

Whitman College

April 1st

Willamette University

March 1st

Williams College

April 1st

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

April 1st

Yale University

Late March

May 1: National College Decision Day

Generally speaking, the latest you will hear back from a college is sometime during the first week of April. This is because May 1st is National College Decision Day. This means that unless you applied early, you must file your official college decision by May 1st. 

Additionally, you will also want to let other colleges know that you will not be attending. Although not required, notifying other colleges helps them better manage their waitlist. In other words, whenever you officially decline an offer of admission, a college can offer your spot to another student. 

What does being waitlisted mean?

There is a chance that you may not receive an acceptance or a rejection letter. Instead, you might receive a letter notifying you that you’ve been placed on a waitlist. This means that as admission slots open up, students placed on the waitlist will be admitted. The tricky thing about being placed on a waitlist is that you may not hear a final decision until August, right before school starts. 

Being placed on a waitlist can feel confusing. Especially as you consider whether or not you want to remain on the waitlist. There are a lot of factors to consider, especially in regard to how being waitlisted might affect your financial

aid. That’s why it’s important to understand what to do if you’ve been waitlisted. You’ll also want to review how to write an email to a college admissions office so that your correspondence continues to be professional and polished.

Key takeaways and moving forward

As college application season comes to a close, you’ll want to start focusing on scholarships and understanding the FAFSA. Not only are these important steps, but they are also great ways to spend your time as you wait to hear from colleges. 

Hopefully, come springtime, you’ll be admitted to your top college. If not, you may want to review common reasons college applications may be rejected. College admissions are incredibly competitive and sometimes it can be comforting to know why your application may have been rejected. 

If you aren’t satisfied with your college decisions, you may want to explore applying to schools with rolling admissions, especially if you wish you had more options. The main difference between regular decision vs rolling admission is that colleges with rolling admissions don’t have strict application deadlines the way that colleges with regular decision deadlines do. Rather, they continue to admit students as long as they have openings.